The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

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Not Telling 2

Changes

Spring has arrived on the Campbell Estate.

There are pros and cons to Spring.

Pros:

  • The river has turned to splashy wet stuff again.
  • My goose friends have returned.
  • A whole lot of birds are singing to me every morning.
  • Elizabeth is going for longer walks with me again.

Cons:

  • It’s getting a bit warm for big woolly dogs like me.
  • The wood ticks are out. They really suck.
  • I need to be extra vigilant because the bears have awakened.
  • There’s a bandit [a Raccoon] raiding the bird feeders and pooping on our deck at night.

I was in swimming even before the river had gone completely splashy this year. I was trying to perform a rescue. I was patrolling ahead of Elizabeth on a walk we took through the forest to our point. When I got to the shore, I heard something breathing oddly. It was in the water, and after a moment or two of looking, I saw its head as it swam along the line of the hard water. The wake it made caused the hard surface, which had formed into fingers in the melting process, to tinkle like the tags on my collar do when I run.

I stepped into the water. It was cold. Even for me, it was cold. I decided that little creature better come out and warm up, so, I barked at it, “Come to shore and warm up! Too cold! Too Cold!

I was too late. It suddenly turned nose down, bottoms up, its broad tail hitting the wet splashy stuff hard as it went out of sight.

I went into emergency mode and leapt out into the frigid river. It’s my Newfy heritage – I can’t help it. I swam out to where I saw it go under and circled. I couldn’t find him.

A couple of minutes later, I saw his nose break the surface. Still alive! I turned for him, but he went down again.

Elizabeth showed up and told me to get out of the water. She was right. I needed to warm up a bit. It was really cold. I climbed out onto the rocks and gave myself a good shake, then I looked at her, pointed at the river with my nose and whined. She’s not much use at cold water rescue but you never know when she might come up with a good idea. Sometimes she surprises me.

“It’s okay, Stella. That’s a beaver. I heard it slap its tail at you. He’s fine.”

And then he came up again!

I plunged back in. No one is better than I at cold water. If I’m freezing to death, then so is that broad-tailed water slapper! I won’t let it happen!

I swam around and around and around again. This time he was gone for good, poor thing. I did my best, really I did. If they’d just relax and let me help, I could save them. I know I could.

We don't have a picture of a real broad-tailed water slapper, but we do have this puppet at the shop. This is exactly what they look like when they are on land. But they spend most of their time in the splashy wet stuff. They eat trees. Really.

We don’t have a picture of a real broad-tailed water slapper, but we do have this puppet at the shop. This is exactly what they look like when they are on land. But they spend most of their time in the splashy wet stuff. They cut down big trees with their teeth and eat the bark. Really.

I was feeling pretty sad about the incident. And I was pretty cold, too. I came over to Elizabeth, shook off and let her feel just how cold the water was. I really could have used a cuddle at that point.

Sometimes Elizabeth doesn’t read me that well. She turned back to the woods and resumed her hunt for deer sheds. She wanted some for making displays at the bookshop.

Two-leggers are strange – there are hundreds of dead branches she could just pick up and take home, but no, she must have only the rare branches that fall from sneaky dear heads during the winter. There were no deer around with branches on their heads that day. I know because I then ran everywhere I could find them and checked. Just branchless deer.All that running helped me to warm up, though, so it’s all good!

We didn’t find any of the sheds on the ground, either. Fortunately, Elizabeth had some in reserve that she could use. She’s busy cleaning them up and oiling them now.

Oh, look! She's got one up now. She thought they'd make a good displayer for the new puppets and First Nations jewellery she's selling at the shop.

Oh, look! She’s got one up. She thought they’d be good for showing off the new puppets and First Nations jewellery she’s selling at the shop.

Last episode, I showed you Bonnie’s second Antique Room and how she was fixing it up. Well, boxes and boxes and boxes have been arriving at her barn, all of them full of new things to fill both her rooms up before the tourist season arrives. Every time she comes to work, she’s bringing in some more wares to add to her inventory list and to price and put on the shelves.

She's got ole looking new stuff...

She’s got old-looking new stuff…

And remember I told you how Bonnie and Elizabeth disappeared for a couple of days? They went off to Winnipeg to an auction, among other things. Sadly, they were outbid on many of the things they had hoped to bring back. But they didn’t come back empty handed. Oh, no! Bonnie got several items. This is the only lot she’s brought to the shop yet.

Bonnie doesn't usually buy china. But something about this Nippon ware caught her attention.

Bonnie doesn’t usually buy china. But something about this Nippon ware caught her attention.

Oh! The scribe just tells me that there was an Elephant with this lot that Bonnie wanted. Sometimes you must get things you aren’t really excited about in order to get the item you really want. She wants to enjoy the Elephant and some of the other wins for a little bit before she sells them, Elizabeth says.

I don’t even know what an Elehpant looks like. I have heard, however, that they are huge and that they have a deep-seated fear of an animal that is just itsy bitsy compared to them. So, Bonnie went to work to make her home more hospitable, more Elephant-friendly. And now we have a different sort of visitor at the bookshop.

I hope it doesn't get into my cookie bag.

I hope it doesn’t get into my cookie bag.

Another update… The village on the ice has disappeared. We’ve had some very warm weather, and the ice is disappearing, too. So all the fishing nomads have packed up their huts and … well, I don’t know what they are doing now. Before they left, though, Bonnie must have paid them a visit, ’cause look what we found sitting on the shelf in the new room:

I can't quite reach it. Maybe if they bring the ladder back into the room I can nip in and get a free fish dinner.

I can’t quite reach it. Maybe if they bring the ladder back into the room I can nip in and get a free fish dinner.

On Saturday on our way home, we got behind a growly beast that was driving very slowly, indicating a turn then not turning and generally snarling up traffic (well, two of us were following anyway) until it finally turned onto our Big Gravel Path. Elizabeth thought that the driver might be lost, so she stopped to see if she could help. The two-legger driving said that they were searchers. The police have suspended their search, but others in the community are carrying on because there is still no sign of Delaine Copenace. They didn’t come down Little Gravel Path, so we aren’t sure just how they were searching. Not door to door, anyhow. I hope they find her. Her family is worried sick.

This is turning out to be a long episode, so I’m going to close it with a few photos from today’s room on the tour, Bonnie’s first Antiques Room. If you see something you like, please drop in and pay us a visit. Maybe I’ll let you take it home with you! BOL

What you see from the doorway.

What you see from the doorway.

 

A nice East Lake Washstand and another wall.

A nice East Lake Washstand and another wall.

But don’t just stand in the doorway. If you don’t come in and turn around, you’ll miss out on a whole lot of other eye candy! Every room is like that.

Bonnie has all kinds of interesting little odds and ends stashed in her rooms. Two-leggers really enjoy exploring them.

Bonnie has all kinds of interesting little odds and ends stashed in her rooms. Two-leggers really enjoy exploring them.

I think Bonnie’s rooms will always be under construction. She’s in them changing them every day she’s working. So, if you drop in and don’t recognise them from our photos, well, don’t panic. We’ll help you get re-oriented. ~:o)=

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