The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

[Scribal Caution: This is not pleasant reading/viewing for insectiphobes.]

The temperatures have been high this week, into the high 20C range (low 80s for my American friends). I still have all my wool. I’m hot.

Feeling too hot isn’t my only problem, though. With the heat, and all the melted snow collected in forest pools, and with the rain, we have other problems starting. Pesky, whining, biting, bloodsucking mosquito problems. Elizabeth has rigged my doghouse opening so that it both brushes flies and skeeters off me as I go in, then flops back into place in such a way as to deter biting insects from entering later. But when we go for our walks in the morning and evening, the mozzies flock to my nose area and feast away.

Elizabeth has always been a mosquito magnet, too. She’s been trying a homeopathic remedy called Mozzi-Q. It works. The mosquitoes just buzz around her. She still gets the odd bite, but not very many. She won’t give me any. She says she doesn’t know if it’s safe for dogs. Some two-legger things aren’t…

So, I suffer. I am coming into the two-legger house more, but I can’t stay inside all the time. So, I suffer.

Mosquito bites make me itchy. When I'm itchy, I look more like a Shar Pei than a Great Newfenees.

Mosquito bites make me itchy. When I’m itchy, I look more like a Shar Pei than a Great Newfenees.

Mosquitoes are not the only problem that comes with Spring. Now that the weather is hot and with all the rain, the grass is growing. Elizabeth says the military have special devices called mine sweepers that detect dangerous explosives hiding in the ground. I am a tick sweeper, not just detecting ticks but gathering them up into my wool as I patrol the estate’s meadows. It’s a tough job. I have already contracted one tick-bourne disease, anaplasmosis. But the job is not without its perks:

Elizabeth checks me for ticks every time I come in from outside. The blue thing on the floor is a tick key, used to remove engorged ticks safely. Every once-in-a-while Elizabeth misses one and it gets big. I look pretty fierce here, don't I...

Elizabeth checks me for ticks every time I come in from outside. The blue thing on the floor is a tick key, used to remove engorged ticks safely. Every once-in-a-while Elizabeth misses one and it gets big. I look pretty fierce here, don’t I…

but really, I love getting deticked. It feels like a doggie spa treatment as Elizabeth goes through my wool and massages my skin with her fingertips.

but really, I love getting deticked. It feels like a doggie spa treatment as Elizabeth goes through my wool and massages my skin with her fingertips.

Oh! And look what she found. This one is small so not a great picture. Sorry, but you get the idea....

Oh! And look what she found. This one is small so not a great picture. Sorry, but you get the idea….

Fortunately, some other forest folk are taking up residence in the neighbourhood to give us a hand with insect control.

I might start hanging out in the garden with this little guy. He's a Gray Tree Frog puppy Hyla versicolor is his latin name. Hiya, Hyla!

I might start hanging out in the garden with this little guy. He’s a Gray Tree Frog puppy Hyla versicolor is his latin name. Versicolor indicates that he changes colour to blend in with his surroundings better. If you look closely, you can see his skin is just starting to turn green. It isn’t an instant process. Hiya, Hyla! How’s the Rhubarb?

Like the rest of us here, this spider enjoys a hearty breakfast. She was too busy eating to tell us her name. If any of you know her, please tell us who she is!

Like the rest of us here, this spider enjoys a hearty breakfast (I don’t think she’ll be dining on any mosquitoes for a while…). She was too busy eating to tell us her name. If any of you know her, please tell us who she is!

Advertisements

Comments on: "Heating Hazards of NWO" (11)

  1. Renée de Bruin said:

    Doesn’t drops help, Stella? Advantix or something like that?

    • We tried Advantix last year. It didn’t work. I got ticks. They bit me. Then they’d die attached, but some of them were engorged before they died, too. Elizabeth doesn’t like using chemicals on me that she needs to put gloves on to administer, either. She thinks there’s something not right about that. So, she checks me thoroughly two or three times a day.

  2. Renée de Bruin said:

    AARGH. Mozi-q is not for sale in Europe, and I’m the chosen victim for every mosquito around!

    • Oh! Poor you! It’s a Canadian thing that came out last year. Something called a homeopathic remedy, Elizabeth says. It isn’t 100% effective, but it sure helps. You’ll have to come visit us and buy some while you are here! ~:o)=

  3. maybe this new thingy called revolution by Pfizer can help? It’s an all in one, we will see if we can get it here too. My Granny is a landing strip for mozzie’s too, she bought such a “flea-collar” for humans what looked totally odd on her. Sadly the mozzie’s came anyway and this time they had a drink and a laugh :o)

    • Do you have Watkins in France, Easy? They make a good creme repellant for two-leggers. Also Avon’s Skin So Soft repels blackflies and mosquitoes. But Elizabeth says you can’t wear those when you are using a camera as the oils and chemicals can get into the workings of the cameras or onto the lenses… not good, apparently. And they aren’t for dogs, sadly.

      • I will look for Watkins…. and while we’re on it… I haven’t seen Avon Ladies here for centuries… where is the Ding-Dong?

      • Both are door-to-door outfits. We’ve never had one call on us, though. Elizabeth thinks they operate more among friends and work acquaintances now.

    • Elizabeth says she’ll look into the Revolution thing…

  4. I didn’t think you’d have such a tick problem with having such cold winters because it’s the warmer parts of Europe that have the most ticks. They’re nasty things. We haven’t found the drops on the back of the neck do much good against them – perhaps it’s because we’re so big and hairy, Stella!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: