The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

Wow! This is our tenth week of wildflowers! I hope you folks are enjoying what we are able to capture despite the wind and rain and mosquitoes. Elizabeth had really hoped to get a lot more pictures this year – the flowers are just so wonderful. I keep telling her not to worry. What we miss this year we can work on next summer. It will give us an opportunity to continue this seasonal series!  ~:o)=

This week, we found a few ‘weeds’ growing around the gardens. Elizabeth decided to show you some of them, since most of them grow in the wild here, too.

Climbing False Buckwheat - Fallopia scandens grows everywhere around here. Sometimes when I go walking over the edges of bedrock outcrops, my paws get tangled up in it. Here it is climbing up the fence, just like its name says it should!

Climbing False Buckwheat – Fallopia scandens grows everywhere around here. Sometimes when I go walking along the edges of bedrock outcrops, my paws get tangled up in it. Here it is climbing up the fence, just like its name says it should!

It's flowers are very tiny, but we did our best to show you what they look like. They're rather delicate little things for such a tenacious weed!

It’s flowers are very tiny, but we did our best to show you what they look like. They’re rather delicate little things for such a tenacious weed!

This may look pretty bit it brings the most misery of invasive weed we have. Allow me to illustrate.

This may look pretty but it brings the most misery of any of the invasive weeds we have. Allow me to illustrate. Now that it has bloomed and she’s taken a photo, it’s all coming down and getting burned in a big bonfire. Meet Burdock – Arctium minus.

Elizabeth watered this garden area, then we walked up the hill to the next garden. On the way up, we found these:

I bet all of you recognise the ubiquitous Dandelion - Taraxacum officinale. I like eating the flowers of this weed, also an import to this country.

I bet all of you recognise the ubiquitous Dandelion – Taraxacum officinale. I like eating the flowers of this weed, also an import to this country.

And here's a weed in an unusual flower colour, brown! Common Plantain - Plantago major forms lots of little seeds when the flowers are over. Elizabeth likes to snack on them on our walks sometimes. She says they have a pleasant nutty flavour. She just pulls the flowering head through her fingers, rolls the seeds between her palms, then carefully blows the husks away. All ready to eat!

And here’s a weed in an unusual flower colour, brown! Common Plantain – Plantago major forms lots of little seeds when the flowers are over. Elizabeth likes to snack on them on our walks sometimes. She says they have a pleasant nutty flavour. She just pulls the flowering head through her fingers, rolls the seeds between her palms, then carefully blows the husks away. All ready to eat!

In the long garden, which Elizabeth has neglected a bit (she’s working on it now, though), there were all kinds of interesting non- cultivated plants growing. Among them:

Wormseed Wallflower - Erysimum cheiranthoides.

Wormseed Wallflower – Erysimum cheiranthoides.

Here's a close-up of it's tiny flowers.

Here’s a close-up of it’s tiny flowers.

Most of us around here think of thistles and see purple, tufty flowers in our mind's eye. But this is a Common Sow-thistle - Sonchus oleraceus.

Most of us around here think of thistles and see purple, tufty flowers in our mind’s eye. But this is a Common Sow-thistle – Sonchus oleraceus.

We found this weed, one Elizabeth hates pulling because she gets bad rashes from it if she isn’t very careful. It was growing right beside the Kitchen Garden!

Stinging Nettle - Urtica dioica. Always wear gloves and long sleeves if you're working near this plant, two-leggers!

Stinging Nettle – Urtica dioica. Always wear gloves and long sleeves if you’re working near this plant, two-leggers!

It has separate male and female flowers on the same plant. We took a close-up for you:

The white ones are male, Elizabeth thinks. She didn't want to go close nto examine them to make sure. BOL

The white ones are male, Elizabeth thinks. She didn’t want to go close nto examine them to make sure. BOL

Beside Kay’s bean garden there is a big White Spruce stump. We found more thistles growing beside it:

A Perennial Sow-thistle - Sonchus arvensis. It's leaves are quite different from its relative in the long garden.

A Perennial Sow-thistle – Sonchus arvensis. It’s leaves are quite different from its relative in the long garden.

And here's one of those purple tufty ones, a Canada Thistle. BOL. Elizabeth says it's another alien species that originated in Europe (that's where Great Pyrenees Mountain Dogs come from, too. So I must be an alien species, too!). So, why do they call it Canada Thistle? BOL Two-leggers! BOL

And here’s one of those purple tufty ones, a Canada Thistle – Cirsium arvense. Elizabeth says it’s another alien species that originated in Europe (that’s where Great Pyrenees Mountain Dogs come from, too. So I must be an alien species, too!). If that’s true, why do they call it Canada Thistle? BOL Two-leggers! BOL

This one grows all over the place, but we went down to the shore to take this picture, because this is our nicest patch of Tansy - Tanacetum vulgare. Sometimes, Elizabeth harvests this and dries the leaves. When she notices ants in the garden, she grinds it into a powder and sprinkles it all over the garden. It seems to work, too. No more ants!

This one grows all over the place, but we went down to the shore to take this picture, because this is our nicest patch of Tansy – Tanacetum vulgare. Sometimes, Elizabeth harvests this and dries the leaves. When she notices ants in the garden, she grinds it into a powder and sprinkles it all over the garden. It seems to work, too. No more ants!

The flowers are difficult to see in that photo, so I asked her to take a photo from above a plant. They’re so tall that this photo is the only way I can see them, too!

They look like Daisies that some lovelorn loser has plucked!

They look like Daisies that some lovelorn loser has plucked!

Well, we’d come all the way down to the shore! While I went off to investigate the neighbours’ properties, I left Elizabeth to photograph some of the wildflowers blooming on the riverbank.

Hiding in among the shore grasses, she found some Wild Mint - Mentha arvensis. It smells lovely!

Hiding in among the shore grasses, she found some Wild Mint – Mentha arvensis. It smells lovely!

Curled Dock

And very close by she found some Curled Dock – Rumex crispus. That latin name makes Elizabeth think a cow might like munching on it.

That’s about when we got sidetracked by the crayfish colony (see yesterday’s post).

Then it was time to head back up the hill. I was getting tired from all my activity, and Elizabeth felt she’d had enough sun for a while. Yes, SUN. It’s still up there in the sky, folks!

As we walked back up the hill we found just a couple more plants for you:

Blueberries mini

Remember we showed you some Blueberry flowers a few weeks ago? This is what they’ve turned into. If Elizabeth can pick enough this year, the two-leggers will feast on Pies and Blueberry Crisps!

And finally, another invasive alien, Alfalfa - Medicago sativa

And finally, another invasive alien, Alfalfa – Medicago sativa. We were a bit late finding this one; its flowers are pretty much over.  ~:o(=

We’ll give you some more wildflower bouquets next week!  ~:o)=

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Comments on: "Wildflower Wednesday 10" (6)

  1. Hell-mut loves the Common Plantain, bet he likes the nutty flavour too :o)

  2. Very pretty wild flowers. Love your dog too.

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