The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

Fungal Friday 4

We went out on Sunday to take some wildflower pictures for you. It was a bit windy, though. As we were walking along we found a lot of fungi springing up, including some we’ve never seen before. They are much easier to photograph because they don’t blow around in the breeze. We aren’t very good at identifying fungi and mushrooms, as I’ve mentioned before, so, if you recognise some here that we haven’t found a name for, please let us know what they are!

We found these tiny white mushrooms growing on a fallen tree trunk.

We found these tiny white mushrooms growing on a fallen tree trunk.

A nicely shaped brown mushroom.

A nicely shaped brown mushroom.

Crown-tipped Coral Fungus - Clavicorona pyxidata

Crown-tipped Coral Fungus – Clavicorona pyxidata

These had stems so, even though we found them on a fallen Balsam Fir trunk, we think they are mushrooms. They were very pretty - looked like they were made from felt and pasted there.

These had stems so, even though we found them on a fallen Balsam Fir trunk, we think they are mushrooms. They were very pretty – looked like they were made from felt and pasted there.

Fly Agaric - Amanita muscaria.

Fly Agaric – Amanita muscaria. Look at the size of it! It’s even bigger than the Balsam Fir tree growing next to it, BOL!

Somebody has a big appetite!

Somebody has a big appetite!

Another sort of shelf fungus, this one growing on a fallen Jack Pine.

Another sort of shelf fungus, this one growing on a fallen Jack Pine.

Although this looks like, well you know..., it isn't. It's some sort of fungal growth we've never seen before. It's growing down the middle of the road for a distance covering several feet. Uuuuugly!

Although this looks like, well you know…, it isn’t. It’s some sort of fungal or mould growth we’ve never seen before. It’s growing down the middle of the Little Gravel Path for a distance covering several feet. Uuuuugly!

We don't know what this beautiful one is. For now, we're calling it Moose Antler Fungus for obvious reasons.

We don’t know what this beautiful one is. For now, we’re calling it Moose Antler Fungus for obvious reasons.

Another pair of unidentified mushrooms, suffering from their proximity to the edge of the road.

Another pair of unidentified mushrooms, suffering from their proximity to the edge of the road.

Elizabeth is very excited about this one because she thinks it's an Oyster Mushroom - Pleurotus populinus. She found it growing on the trunk of a Trembling Aspen. They are supposed to be very good eating.

Elizabeth is very excited about this one because she thinks it’s an Oyster Mushroom – Pleurotus populinus. She found it growing on the trunk of a Trembling Aspen. They are supposed to be very good eating.

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Comments on: "Fungal Friday 4" (2)

  1. as I was a child I thought all mushrooms with snail bites are edible… fortunately my grampy informed me that I was totally wrong. I always wonder why the fly agaric looks so cute although it is toxic… or at least a one-time-snack :o)

    • Elizabeth says it’s a great mushroom to photograph, but many people give her a hard time when they see her photos of it. It’s used as an hallucinogenic drug by some and is quite famous here for that reason.

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