The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

Things are winding down in the Wildflower world, but we found a few to show you yet this week.

Remember the Dandelion wannabe we mentioned last week? It’s dusty from the Big Gravel Path, but we took this photo of it for you:

Narrow-leaf Hawkweed - Hieracium umbellatum. You can see the tell-tale leaves in this photo.

Narrow-leaf Hawkweed – Hieracium umbellatum. You can see the tell-tale leaves in this photo.

I know you’ve already seen this flower here, but this picture illustrates its main identifying feature better than the last one we showed you. See the peculiar teeth along the leaf margins? Those are only found on the Narrow-leaf Hawkweed.

Generally, thistles have a basal whorl of leaves (like an inverted Christmas tree skirt) as well as smaller leaves growing up the stem. Hawkweeds are missing the basal whorl and are less sturdy looking plants.

Fireweed - Epilobium angustifolium, so called because it often grows prolifically in post burn areas. There aren't as many growing on the 'Estate' as usual this year.

Fireweed – Epilobium angustifolium, so called because it often grows prolifically in post burn areas. There aren’t as many growing on the ‘Estate’ as usual this year.

These beautiful flowers grow up so high that I have trouble seeing them. You can see in the photo on the left that they are as tall as Tansy, even taller sometimes! This one was over a meter high.

Here's a close-up of the flower for you to look at. This one has already started to develop some seed pods lower down. You can just see them at the bottom of the photo...

Here’s a close-up of the flower for you to look at. This one has already started to develop some seed pods lower down. You can just see them at the bottom of the photo…

The Fireweed is the territorial flower of The Yukon. It isn’t quite as tall there, Elizabeth says (she’s seen it when she’s been to visit her brother), and the colour is more intense. She says that with such a short growing season up that far north, it needs all the power to attract pollinators it can muster!

Way back eleven weeks ago, we showed you the Bunchberry flower. This week while we were out on a Wildflower Safari, we found some berries to show you:

Bunchberry - Cornus canadensis Berries.

Bunchberry – Cornus canadensis Berries.

There always seem to be Buttercups growing, right through the summer. We haven’t shown you any this year because they catch the wind so much, and it has been a very windy summer. But this week we managed to find a flower that was in a sheltered spot:

Here is the flower of a Tall Buttercup - Ranunculus acris. buttercups all have those shiny petals, but if you look closely at the flowers, you can often tell what type of buttercup you are looking at. We'll show you the different ones next year, perhaps.

Here is the flower of a Tall Buttercup – Ranunculus acris. Buttercups all have those shiny petals, but if you look closely at the flowers, you can often tell what type of buttercup you are looking at. We’ll show you the different ones next year, perhaps.

Already there are frost warnings popping up in the overnight weather forecasts for very near here. Elizabeth is hoping that her garden gets a bit more time for ripening. But a frost will put an end to the wildflower season, too. Keep your fingers crossed for us!

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Comments on: "Wildflower Wednesday 14" (6)

  1. Is it common that you get signs of frost in late august? or is it only this year?

  2. That photo of a buttercup is so pretty, it almost looks like it has been crafted by a very clever artist!

  3. It sounds as though you’d better get busy growing your winter coat, Stella!
    The flowers are pretty, I hope you don’t get a frost that kills them all.

    • Thank you, Clowie! I’m still working on getting rid of the last of last winter’s coat. Looking rather scruffy, BOL. Elizabeth has started giving me some salmon oil in hopes that will speed up the process.

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