The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

Posts tagged ‘floods’

But Do They Taste Good?

We’ve been busy looking for flowers to show you tomorrow. Yesterday we went on a little shoreline walk. It’s still much closer than it usually is. In fact, the water has only gone down an 2-5 cm over the last week. So, the shoreline flowers are not the usual variety at all.

I got a bit bored with photography – it involves a lot more sitting around than I appreciate – so I went on a patrol of the neighbouring shoreline properties. Everyone had gone home now that the weekend is over. Sometimes they go but they leave interesting things behind. Like last week, for example, someone left a partially eaten corn cob for me to take home and snack on… until Elizabeth found me chomping on it.  ~:o/=  She muttered something about genetically modified compost fodder and tossed it into the rotten food machine.

There was something strange on the next cove up from our bay, and I started to bark. Elizabeth called me back.

When I finished barking… I found her, still taking photographs. I thought maybe she’d like to come over with me and see that strange thing I was barking about. But, before I could persuade her, I was distracted by a movement in the shallows.

Whoa! What's THAT?

Whoa! What’s THAT?

"That's a crayfish, Stella."

“That’s a crayfish, Stella.”

I know a lot of two-leggers seem to like eating things that live in the river.

Hmmm.... Does it taste good?

Hmmm…. Does it taste good?

Elizabeth suggested I try catching one to sample. She said some two-leggers like them….

So, I decided to go Crawdaddin'. Unfortunately, I didn't have much luck. Next time, I must try a different approach.

So, I decided to go Crawdaddin’. Unfortunately, I didn’t have much luck. Next time, I must try a different approach.

Elizabeth says I can eat all that I want. There were scores of them scooting around; some of them seemed to be eating and others seemed to be busy trying to scare each other. As soon as I got into the water, they all used their tails to propel themselves into crevices in the bedrock and into gaps under submerged stones.

Apparently, these are not the species of crayfish that used to live here when Elizabeth was a two-legger pup. She says that they were much prettier. The ones we saw today have been brought in by fishermen who use them as bait. They are a very voracious species, and they have killed off all of our indigenous crayfish, clams, eaten all our ‘sea’ weed and heaven knows what else.

I wonder why two-leggers couldn’t use the crayfish that belong here as bait. The fish got by just fine eating them since long before fishermen came along. Judging from the number of crayfish I saw on that stretch of bedrock, the local fish don’t have much of an appetite for these newcomers….

Two-leggers often leave me shaking my head. Seems they don’t have much sense when it comes to living in the world around them. Always trying to manage and improve on things that worked just fine since the dawn of time. And what happens? Everywhere they go, two-leggers leave messes behind that everyone else must contend with. What is the matter with them?

Advertisements

Flood, Flood, Go Away!

Elizabeth thought we should give you another flood update. We’re getting so used to the high water now that it seems almost normal. Our heart goes out to those on lower ground, though. On the way home from work on Saturday, we saw the people who live at the bridge checking their sandbags and stacking driftwood into a big cone formation. We think they’re going to have a giant bonfire! Maybe that will evaporate some of the excess water. Worth a try. Elizabeth says it’s probably more a case of, “When life floats you driftwood, make a fire and toast Smores!”

Our view remains similar:

We still have our new island view.

We still have our new island view.

But, there is a difference that is quite noticeable. We’ve lost an old friend.

~:o(=

This is one of the last of the Jackpines (Pinus banksiana) that have lived in our yard since Elizabeth was a tow-legger puppy, many, many dog years ago. This year's prolonged flood waters have drowned it.

This is one of the last of the Jackpines (Pinus banksiana) that have lived in our yard since Elizabeth was a two-legger puppy, many, many dog years ago. This year’s prolonged flood waters have drowned it.

Kathleen is busy making arrangements to take it down before Malcolm comes home this autumn so he can split the wood. We’ll use it to help keep the house warm this winter.  Losing this old tree will really change our view of our bay!

And all this water has given me a bit of a problem as well.

Do I really have to get my ear done?

Do I really have to get my ear done?

I keep getting yeast infections in my ears. Right now, it’s my left ear that’s driving me CRAZY. It feels good when Elizabeth cleans it and puts some Calendula ointment on it, but I really hate the drops she drips in. They tickle and feel like a creepy-crawly is exploring inside. I must admit that I do start feeling better a day or two after she starts giving me the drops, though. I don’t see why she needs to keep giving them to me after that but, every morning and every evening, the dreaded, long-snouted squeeze-bottle makes an appearance. No matter how hard I try to hide, I can never escape.

We’re getting some horrible heat now, too. Temps are rising into the high 20C to low 30C range. This means it’s getting really humid, too. And heat and humidity always seem to bring terrible thunderstorms with them. I don’t like those, but I don’t get really upset like some dogs do. I just find a quiet corner near Elizabeth and curl up into a ball until it’s all over. So far, we’ve been lucky. Just a couple of trees down. We’d use those for firewood, too – if we could find some help getting them down to the house before unidentified neighbours steal them for their own woodpile.

I’d give those thieves a good bite if I could catch them. They’re fortunate that I’m in the house a lot these days. The insects and the heat are just too much for me. You see, part of my problem is that my Spring Blow Out is late this year. We’re still trying to tease the last of my winter wool out. Sometimes I look a bit scruffy because I try to get it out myself by chewing and pulling little clumps out. I figure if I do my share, it’ll mean less of The Brush. I HATE The Brush. I don’t care if I feel much better afterward. I HATE The Brush.

Oh, all right. So I look and feel better after I get brushed. but it takes so long. Can't I just cool down with a run through the swamp?

Oh, all right. So I look and feel better after I get brushed. But it takes so long. Can’t I just cool down with a run through the swamp?

Elizabeth says I wouldn’t have to bite anyone if I lived that way. All I’d have to do is stand upwind and they’d think a bear was coming after them.

BOL. Sometimes, she’s just too funny!

Flood Update

We are still having rain nearly every day, and the water continues to rise slowly throughout our area.

In Kenora, the city parents have decided to close some of the public land extenders since most of them are now underwater. We’ve seen pictures on Facebook of two-legger homes further downriver from us where sandbagging is complete and holding the rising river at bay. A waterfront restaurant in Kenora – on the Lake of the Woods – has had to close as its floor is now underwater (not the first time this building has suffered – Elizabeth wonders why businesses are even allowed to locate there…).

This is the Boathouse Restaurant just two blocks from the bookshop. The plastic barrels and the old boat are on the wooden walkway and filled with water to keep the structure from floating away.

This is the Boathouse Restaurant just two blocks from the bookshop. The plastic barrels and the old boat are on the wooden walkway and filled with water to keep the structure from floating away.

Elizabeth was hoping to go out in the canoe on a photo safari, just to see how things looked from Darlington Bay level. Unfortunately, the weather has been so unstable and terribly windy that she couldn’t risk going out with her camera gear. But she took some photos on the waterfront of our neighbourhood (sorry for the lens drops and fuzziness – she was shooting between and during squalls) so you could see what’s happening here. And our friend Karin contributed a couple to show what’s happening over on Siggy’s Island at their house.

Here is our pumphouse. It is usually much farther from the shore. we're a bit worried about the waterline floating up like that, but don't know what we can do about it. It's still functioning, anyway...

Here is our pumphouse. It is usually much farther from the shore. we’re a bit worried about the waterline floating up like that, but don’t know what we can do about it. It’s still functioning, anyway…

 

Squall moving through, so we took shelter here. Nasty weather!

Squall moving through, so we took shelter here. Nasty weather!

 

Our neighbours two doors down must go uphill to their floating dock now. Normally, they could have a good slide downhill!

Our neighbours two doors down must go uphill to their floating land extender now. Normally, they could have a good slide downhill!

Elizabeth says it’s kind of difficult to understand how big a deal this is because the shoreline is so steep that non residents wouldn’t think the water was necessarily high. So she found an old photo of The Point so you could see better. She used it for an ad for her bookmarks and couldn’t find the original, so please ignore the text.

The cliff is about 4.5m at the highest point when the water is at normal levels.

The cliff on The Point is about 4.5m at the highest point when the water is at normal levels.

 

Taken yesterday between squalls. We're still getting severe storms/downpours every day.

The same view (slightly wider angle) taken yesterday between squalls. We’re still getting severe storms/downpours every day.

Karin managed to take some pictures during a sunny period last week:

Karin & Dan are watching with anxious eyes as the water goes up. We aren't sure why they haven't sandbagged - perhaps there isn't a way of getting the equipment over to Siggy's Island.

Karin & Dan are watching with anxious eyes as the water goes up. We aren’t sure why they haven’t sandbagged – perhaps there is no way of getting the equipment over to Siggy’s Island. BTW, the far shore in this photo is the other side of The Point and my ‘estate’, from where I used to bark over to Siggy.

 

They've done their best to help the Loons in the area. This Loon has two puppies now, and another pair in the lake that drains into Darlington Bay also are able to raise their family thanks to Karin and Dan's efforts to put their nests on floating (anchored) platforms. The Loons are so thankful that they sing us lullabies every night!

They’ve done their best to help the Loons in the area. This Loon has two puppies now, and another pair in the lake that drains into Darlington Bay also are able to raise their family thanks to Karin and Dan’s efforts to put their nests on floating (anchored) platforms. The Loons are so thankful that they sing us lullabies every night!

A local photographer friend of Elizabeth’s, Tom Thomson, has also been out with his camera. He said she could share this video with you, taken at the headwaters of the West Arm of the Winnipeg River, travelling from Lake of the Woods directly toward the Norman Dam. It shows one of the hazards of flooding in this region. As the water rises, it lifts something called ‘floating bog’, which grows in quiet, still waters in bays or between islands along the Lake. New currents, in the usually current-free areas where this floating bog occurs, tear it apart, carrying pieces downstream at, as you can see, an alarming rate. These are thick, solid mats of vegetation, sometimes with trees or shrubbery growing on them. Even two-leggers can often walk quite safely on this type of bog, although they will probably get their feet soaked along the way. It is not uncommon, during high water years, to see someone struggling to pull bog islands such as these out to safer locations using a tow rope attached to their growling floating tin cans. The mat shown here could easily tear a wooden land extender from its moorings or damage a moored floating tin can.

 

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: