The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

Posts tagged ‘night-life’

A Little Night Moving

We’re still having some grrrreat weather here in my Boreal Forest kingdom. On Friday, the temperatures went up alarmingly from -35C to -13C, but the rising red line on the thermometer came with an Alberta Clipper, which dumped another 15cm of fluffy white stuff! My model Pyrenees Mountain Range is already awesome. I can’t wait to see what it looks like after Rob the Snowman’s next visit. Elizabeth thinks I should maybe think Himalayan…

By Friday night, we were well and truly snowed in (again!). Elizabeth went to the door to call me in for bedtime…

Bedtime? No, no, it's playtime! Come play with me!

Bedtime? Surely you mean playtime? Come play with me!

She doesn’t seem to like the dark much. When we go out at night, she always needs to either light up the whole yard or carry a light with her. I don’t think her eyes work too well in the dark… Tonight, since her paws were full of camera, she lit the whole yard up. The snow was really coming down, so it looked rather magical, I think. Hope you like our pictures!

I'm the only one that uses the stairs in the winter. Well, sometimes the Sneaky Deer do, too...

I’m the only one that uses the stairs in the winter. Well, sometimes the Sneaky Deer do, too…

The trees are getting blankets for the colder weather the weatherman says is on its way.

The trees are getting blankets for the colder weather the weatherman says is on its way.

Speaking of blankets… Didn’t I hear someone say it was bedtime?

I am feeling a little bit tired... Goodnight, all!

I am feeling a little bit tired… Goodnight, all!

Happy N-n-n-ew Year! Brrr…

Not quite a Wordless Wednesday.

It’s very cold in my Boreal Realm these days. As my faithful scribe types, I am dictating from the other side of her wall hole, where it is a bit warmer than it was yesterday, but still a pleasantly chilling, wool-raising -35C with a windchill that makes it feel more like -42C (that’s -46F to American woofers). Definitely not short coat weather.

So, since Elizabeth doesn’t function in such cold, I thought I’d get her to post some of last year’s sneaky deer moments for your viewing pleasure. While she’s doing that, I’m going to run off and clear a few more problem areas under some of our pine trees…

A young buck puzzled by the new garden fence and enticed by the smells beyond...

A young buck puzzled by the new garden fence and enticed by the smells beyond…

Later that evening. Still trying to figure out a way in. Not the sharpest antlers on the rack...

Later that evening. Still trying to figure out a way in. Not the sharpest antlers on the rack…

Intruder caught red-handed . . . sort of. They really do their best at being sneaky!

Intruder caught red-handed . . . sort of. They really do their best at being sneaky!

A morning walk - on our way to the new security camera.

A morning walk – on our way to the new security camera.

I want my breakfast. Elizabeth is just to slow. She's keeping me on the lead because it's that time of year when the bucks get aggressive. As if I don't know about all of that!

I want my breakfast. Elizabeth is just too slow. She’s keeping me on the lead because it’s that time of year when the bucks get aggressive. As if I don’t know about all of that!

Still not getting great sneaky deer photos. This one is sneaking

Still not getting great sneaky deer photos. This one is sneaking just above the shadow on the left. Kudos if you catch him!

Elizabeth has made a New Year’s Resolution to get some great wildlife candids on the new security camera for you to see this year. I’ll see if I can chase some intruders by for you, too. Gotta do my part!

Happy New Year, everybody!

~:oP=

Learning to Soar

One day last autumn I was with Elizabeth in the living room of the two-legger house. She was making two-legger fur on her sticks and I was hard at work keeping her feet warm. All was as it should be until I felt a shadow in the room. I knew I hadn’t imagined it when Elizabeth dropped her sticks and called Kay. But Kay wasn’t in hearing range….

A few minutes later, while both of us were looking out the wall hole to see if it would come back, a great big brown flapper seemed to drop out of the sky. It wasn’t flapping. Elizabeth said it was soaring. And it was soaring straight into our wall hole!

It was huge. Even if the glass wasn’t there to keep critters out, that flapper would have had trouble getting through without clipping its wing tips. We thought there was going to be a terrible crash.

But the flapper realised just in the nick of time that it couldn’t pass through. Maybe it saw us at the last moment. Sometimes the wall hole has a sort of shine on it or it reflects instead of letting you see through. Little flappers bump into it sometimes by mistake. But I’ve never seen a flapper this big crash into a wall hole!

Elizabeth said it was a baby white headed big black flapper.

White headed big black flapper fishing. Click on the photo to learn more about these raptors.

White headed big black flapper fishing. Click on the photo to learn more about these raptors. Photo from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Facebook page.

I said no. It was brown and way too big for one of those.

She explained that it takes them a few years to grow the black and white feathers that the mature flappers wear. And because they aren’t as good as flying, their big primary feathers are inches longer than those of the adult birds – it gives them more lift, more time to manoeuvre. Which was a good thing for this youngster. We winced as one of his flapper tips smacked the wall hole. But he got away fine.

I think he was a bit shaken up by his experience, though. Elizabeth let me go outside because I was so excited by what we’d witnessed. I saw the big brown flapper fly past Al’s and Joanne’s house and down over the bay to a big old dead jack pine, which he managed to grab with his feet on his third pass. He folded up his wings and sat there for a long time, making a lot of chirping noises.

His parents flew over to see what he was on about. I don’t understand white headed big black flapper talk, but it sounded as if they were trying to get him to come back to their house. It’s in a tree on the island past Siggy’s Island. It sounded like the youngster was saying, “No way! I just nearly killed myself doing that flying thing and I’m not going anywhere that way again! No way!”

Eventually mom and dad flew back to their house. Perhaps they thought that if they ignored him and went home, he’d eventually fly back. The big brown flapper was a stubborn cusser though. He meant what he told them. I know because I listened to him chirping away. He was really loud. And he kept on chirping. All. Night. Long. Every once-in-a-while I heard the parents from the island calling back. I think they were telling him to shut up and go to sleep. If I spoke white headed big black flapper, I’d have been yelling at him, too!

I think in the morning his dad read him the riot act. “Get back home this minute or you’ll never see another fish/deer haunch/goose from me again!” It’d work with me. I just love eating too much. Evidently, it worked for junior, too. The noise eventually stopped, and later in the day I saw the whole family cruising the thermals over the next bay down.

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