The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

Posts tagged ‘Summer’

‘Woofless’ Catch Up…

Drying off after a summer swim. Doesn't my wet mark look like a sheep? I decided to guard it, just in case...

Drying off after a swim last summer. Doesn’t my wet mark look like a sheep? I decided to guard it, just in case…

 

The bookshop moved into the front of the building again in July, and joined forces with a local antiques shop. Here I am, between customers, in the new shared space.

The bookshop moved into the front of the building again in July, and joined forces with a local antiques shop. Here I am, between customers, in the new shared space.

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Wildflower Wednesday 14

Things are winding down in the Wildflower world, but we found a few to show you yet this week.

Remember the Dandelion wannabe we mentioned last week? It’s dusty from the Big Gravel Path, but we took this photo of it for you:

Narrow-leaf Hawkweed - Hieracium umbellatum. You can see the tell-tale leaves in this photo.

Narrow-leaf Hawkweed – Hieracium umbellatum. You can see the tell-tale leaves in this photo.

I know you’ve already seen this flower here, but this picture illustrates its main identifying feature better than the last one we showed you. See the peculiar teeth along the leaf margins? Those are only found on the Narrow-leaf Hawkweed.

Generally, thistles have a basal whorl of leaves (like an inverted Christmas tree skirt) as well as smaller leaves growing up the stem. Hawkweeds are missing the basal whorl and are less sturdy looking plants.

Fireweed - Epilobium angustifolium, so called because it often grows prolifically in post burn areas. There aren't as many growing on the 'Estate' as usual this year.

Fireweed – Epilobium angustifolium, so called because it often grows prolifically in post burn areas. There aren’t as many growing on the ‘Estate’ as usual this year.

These beautiful flowers grow up so high that I have trouble seeing them. You can see in the photo on the left that they are as tall as Tansy, even taller sometimes! This one was over a meter high.

Here's a close-up of the flower for you to look at. This one has already started to develop some seed pods lower down. You can just see them at the bottom of the photo...

Here’s a close-up of the flower for you to look at. This one has already started to develop some seed pods lower down. You can just see them at the bottom of the photo…

The Fireweed is the territorial flower of The Yukon. It isn’t quite as tall there, Elizabeth says (she’s seen it when she’s been to visit her brother), and the colour is more intense. She says that with such a short growing season up that far north, it needs all the power to attract pollinators it can muster!

Way back eleven weeks ago, we showed you the Bunchberry flower. This week while we were out on a Wildflower Safari, we found some berries to show you:

Bunchberry - Cornus canadensis Berries.

Bunchberry – Cornus canadensis Berries.

There always seem to be Buttercups growing, right through the summer. We haven’t shown you any this year because they catch the wind so much, and it has been a very windy summer. But this week we managed to find a flower that was in a sheltered spot:

Here is the flower of a Tall Buttercup - Ranunculus acris. buttercups all have those shiny petals, but if you look closely at the flowers, you can often tell what type of buttercup you are looking at. We'll show you the different ones next year, perhaps.

Here is the flower of a Tall Buttercup – Ranunculus acris. Buttercups all have those shiny petals, but if you look closely at the flowers, you can often tell what type of buttercup you are looking at. We’ll show you the different ones next year, perhaps.

Already there are frost warnings popping up in the overnight weather forecasts for very near here. Elizabeth is hoping that her garden gets a bit more time for ripening. But a frost will put an end to the wildflower season, too. Keep your fingers crossed for us!

Fungal Friday 4

We went out on Sunday to take some wildflower pictures for you. It was a bit windy, though. As we were walking along we found a lot of fungi springing up, including some we’ve never seen before. They are much easier to photograph because they don’t blow around in the breeze. We aren’t very good at identifying fungi and mushrooms, as I’ve mentioned before, so, if you recognise some here that we haven’t found a name for, please let us know what they are!

We found these tiny white mushrooms growing on a fallen tree trunk.

We found these tiny white mushrooms growing on a fallen tree trunk.

A nicely shaped brown mushroom.

A nicely shaped brown mushroom.

Crown-tipped Coral Fungus - Clavicorona pyxidata

Crown-tipped Coral Fungus – Clavicorona pyxidata

These had stems so, even though we found them on a fallen Balsam Fir trunk, we think they are mushrooms. They were very pretty - looked like they were made from felt and pasted there.

These had stems so, even though we found them on a fallen Balsam Fir trunk, we think they are mushrooms. They were very pretty – looked like they were made from felt and pasted there.

Fly Agaric - Amanita muscaria.

Fly Agaric – Amanita muscaria. Look at the size of it! It’s even bigger than the Balsam Fir tree growing next to it, BOL!

Somebody has a big appetite!

Somebody has a big appetite!

Another sort of shelf fungus, this one growing on a fallen Jack Pine.

Another sort of shelf fungus, this one growing on a fallen Jack Pine.

Although this looks like, well you know..., it isn't. It's some sort of fungal growth we've never seen before. It's growing down the middle of the road for a distance covering several feet. Uuuuugly!

Although this looks like, well you know…, it isn’t. It’s some sort of fungal or mould growth we’ve never seen before. It’s growing down the middle of the Little Gravel Path for a distance covering several feet. Uuuuugly!

We don't know what this beautiful one is. For now, we're calling it Moose Antler Fungus for obvious reasons.

We don’t know what this beautiful one is. For now, we’re calling it Moose Antler Fungus for obvious reasons.

Another pair of unidentified mushrooms, suffering from their proximity to the edge of the road.

Another pair of unidentified mushrooms, suffering from their proximity to the edge of the road.

Elizabeth is very excited about this one because she thinks it's an Oyster Mushroom - Pleurotus populinus. She found it growing on the trunk of a Trembling Aspen. They are supposed to be very good eating.

Elizabeth is very excited about this one because she thinks it’s an Oyster Mushroom – Pleurotus populinus. She found it growing on the trunk of a Trembling Aspen. They are supposed to be very good eating.

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