The adventuresome life of a Great Pyrenees/Newfoundland dog in Northwestern Ontario

Posts tagged ‘Winnipeg River’

More New Neighbours

Every winter we see a temporary rise in the population here abouts. I’m not crazy about new neighbours, so I’m glad that they usually seem to stay out of my territory, building their huts on the hard water about two miles down the bay from us.

These neighbours are mostly male two-leggers. They spend most of their time in their huts, sometimes alone, sometimes together. Some of them have special panels on their huts that convert the sunlight to something called electricity. This allows them to do some light cooking and to watch sports on their noisy boxes.

They drink beer a lot, too, some of them. Sometimes, when they erect one of their huts in my territory, they leave cases of this beer stuff behind. I hate to see it go to waste, so I bring it back home and enjoy it while I monitor goings on from my watching rock. Until Elizabeth notices…. She doesn’t like me indulging in any way whatsoever. I don’t know why. I figure I burn enough calories chewing through the tin cans to get the good stuff inside… Perhaps its because it makes me burp a lot.

It seems that these hut two-leggers spend more time at their huts on weekends. We were coming home from work on Saturday when I noticed some activity in the village, so I asked Elizabeth if she would go back and take a picture so I could show you. The dwellings are very primitive as you can see. The one that sometimes goes up on my patrol route is actually a tent! That makes it much easier for me to access. It also means I can tell you about one of the other, very strange features I’ve noticed about these huts… They have holes in the floor! The two-leggers who live inside dangle strings that have hooks with tiny fish impaled on them (ouch!). The two-leggers sit for hours watching those holes. Then, when they notice any movement of the line, they quickly go to that hole and pull up the string. And what do you know? The tiny little fish has grown to monster size!

The fish-growing village down the bay from us. It is smaller this year than it usually is. We have been having a much warmer winter and the ice took a long time to get thick enough for cars and huts, so I think many of the fish-grower two-leggers went north this year. It apparently is colder further north...

The fish-growing village down the bay from us. It is smaller this year than it usually is. We have been having a much warmer winter and the hard water took a long time to get thick enough for growly beasts and huts, so I think many of the fish-grower two-leggers went north this year. It apparently is colder further north… Notice the hard water path made especially for growly beasts to travel on in the foreground.

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Flood Update

We are still having rain nearly every day, and the water continues to rise slowly throughout our area.

In Kenora, the city parents have decided to close some of the public land extenders since most of them are now underwater. We’ve seen pictures on Facebook of two-legger homes further downriver from us where sandbagging is complete and holding the rising river at bay. A waterfront restaurant in Kenora – on the Lake of the Woods – has had to close as its floor is now underwater (not the first time this building has suffered – Elizabeth wonders why businesses are even allowed to locate there…).

This is the Boathouse Restaurant just two blocks from the bookshop. The plastic barrels and the old boat are on the wooden walkway and filled with water to keep the structure from floating away.

This is the Boathouse Restaurant just two blocks from the bookshop. The plastic barrels and the old boat are on the wooden walkway and filled with water to keep the structure from floating away.

Elizabeth was hoping to go out in the canoe on a photo safari, just to see how things looked from Darlington Bay level. Unfortunately, the weather has been so unstable and terribly windy that she couldn’t risk going out with her camera gear. But she took some photos on the waterfront of our neighbourhood (sorry for the lens drops and fuzziness – she was shooting between and during squalls) so you could see what’s happening here. And our friend Karin contributed a couple to show what’s happening over on Siggy’s Island at their house.

Here is our pumphouse. It is usually much farther from the shore. we're a bit worried about the waterline floating up like that, but don't know what we can do about it. It's still functioning, anyway...

Here is our pumphouse. It is usually much farther from the shore. we’re a bit worried about the waterline floating up like that, but don’t know what we can do about it. It’s still functioning, anyway…

 

Squall moving through, so we took shelter here. Nasty weather!

Squall moving through, so we took shelter here. Nasty weather!

 

Our neighbours two doors down must go uphill to their floating dock now. Normally, they could have a good slide downhill!

Our neighbours two doors down must go uphill to their floating land extender now. Normally, they could have a good slide downhill!

Elizabeth says it’s kind of difficult to understand how big a deal this is because the shoreline is so steep that non residents wouldn’t think the water was necessarily high. So she found an old photo of The Point so you could see better. She used it for an ad for her bookmarks and couldn’t find the original, so please ignore the text.

The cliff is about 4.5m at the highest point when the water is at normal levels.

The cliff on The Point is about 4.5m at the highest point when the water is at normal levels.

 

Taken yesterday between squalls. We're still getting severe storms/downpours every day.

The same view (slightly wider angle) taken yesterday between squalls. We’re still getting severe storms/downpours every day.

Karin managed to take some pictures during a sunny period last week:

Karin & Dan are watching with anxious eyes as the water goes up. We aren't sure why they haven't sandbagged - perhaps there isn't a way of getting the equipment over to Siggy's Island.

Karin & Dan are watching with anxious eyes as the water goes up. We aren’t sure why they haven’t sandbagged – perhaps there is no way of getting the equipment over to Siggy’s Island. BTW, the far shore in this photo is the other side of The Point and my ‘estate’, from where I used to bark over to Siggy.

 

They've done their best to help the Loons in the area. This Loon has two puppies now, and another pair in the lake that drains into Darlington Bay also are able to raise their family thanks to Karin and Dan's efforts to put their nests on floating (anchored) platforms. The Loons are so thankful that they sing us lullabies every night!

They’ve done their best to help the Loons in the area. This Loon has two puppies now, and another pair in the lake that drains into Darlington Bay also are able to raise their family thanks to Karin and Dan’s efforts to put their nests on floating (anchored) platforms. The Loons are so thankful that they sing us lullabies every night!

A local photographer friend of Elizabeth’s, Tom Thomson, has also been out with his camera. He said she could share this video with you, taken at the headwaters of the West Arm of the Winnipeg River, travelling from Lake of the Woods directly toward the Norman Dam. It shows one of the hazards of flooding in this region. As the water rises, it lifts something called ‘floating bog’, which grows in quiet, still waters in bays or between islands along the Lake. New currents, in the usually current-free areas where this floating bog occurs, tear it apart, carrying pieces downstream at, as you can see, an alarming rate. These are thick, solid mats of vegetation, sometimes with trees or shrubbery growing on them. Even two-leggers can often walk quite safely on this type of bog, although they will probably get their feet soaked along the way. It is not uncommon, during high water years, to see someone struggling to pull bog islands such as these out to safer locations using a tow rope attached to their growling floating tin cans. The mat shown here could easily tear a wooden land extender from its moorings or damage a moored floating tin can.

 

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